Image Lists

Image lists:

Most of the time- though not all the time, you will be asked for an image list. Again- follow directions. You may be asked for titles, item numbers, year created, materials, sizes and process. Whatever you do- make sure you stay consistent in the order in which you list these things. Your image list should always include the name of the corresponding digital file. I have found that the easiest way to do this is to insert images directly into a word doc.

  • Your name.
  • Title of your work. All titles should be italicized or underlined.
  • The medium. Be reasonable in your choice of terms: “mixed-media” is not enough, but including the glue you used to put the thing back together may be too much.
  • Date of completion.
  • Dimensions. Whenever you provide dimensions for a work of art, you must use the following conventions:
  • 3-D works: Height x Width x Depth (always in that order)
  • 2-D works: Height x Width (always in that order)
  • Keep your units of measurement consistent. Within the U.S., measurements are typically recorded in feet and inches. Outside the U.S. the metric system is normally used. Both are acceptable. Whichever system you select, be consistent.
  • Location. If the work is part of an important collection or gallery show, name the gallery, and if it is a site-specific piece, indicate the location.
  • Condition. If the work has been removed or destroyed, that should be indicated.
  • Contact information: phone number and/or email.
  • Photo credit.

Example:Image list for Jolien Verweij

9 thoughts on “Image Lists

  1. This is exceedingly helpful and concise. Looking back at past applications, I was always dumbfounded thinking at the best way to approaching image lists and dealing with the appropriate terminology. I found myself most confused when labeling medium and dimensions for it always seemed like the institution was looking for something specific but never asked for what they wanted directly. It often made me feel as if I was simply out of the loop on how I was supposed to present that information when everyone around me just simply knew how already.

  2. Things for I should do with making an image list:
    1. Follow the directions
    2. With: name and title (italicized or underlined), medium, date of completion, dimensions [H x W x (D)], consistency of unites measurement, location (the name of the gallery), note if it exist, contact information, and photo credit.

  3. I’m unsurprised to see that consistency continues to be key, but I have a question when it comes to artist names, how do you decide when it comes to topics such as these?

    Additionally, for sizes of pieces, even if you are in the US, what are your thoughts on using cm as measurement? I was considering using the metric system out of pure preference, as I think 36 cm is more elegant than something like 12.5 inches. Does elegance play a role at all or is it more important to be practical?

  4. Working out of word doc makes plenty of sense for keeping things orderly in a universal platform. The way this reads is that your photos would be uploaded to word as reference to do the write up and uploaded separately when actually uploading the images to be submitted.

  5. It is important to keep track of when you made your work. While doing this assignment and using slideroom, I found it difficult to remember the date of when I had finished a piece and found myself having to estimate the month it was made (luckily the year was easier to remember).

  6. This is a really useful, very brief chart sheet for how our image lists should look. I have worked on these before but its really nice to have the specific information/general requirements listed here at our disposal. The dimensions information is probably the most beneficial as the rest is pretty straight forward.

  7. Image lists are helpful to keep for yourself as well just so you know what files and file sizes you sent to whom.

    I assume the file format should be clear, organized and easy to read. Any advice beyond that?

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